All resources aimed at people with User Profile: A history buff

What is it? Toolkit

What does it allow you to do? Create VR exhibits using the UNREAL4 game engine

Cost? Free

Who is it for?


We are all used to creating exhibits using artefacts, text and pictures, but how do we do this using our digital assets? How do we make them available for the public to view, enjoy and learn? This toolkit provides guidelines and templates to make virtual exhibits.

To get the most out of this toolkit you need to be able to use the UNREAL4 game engine – multimedia companies, games designers or your local “techy” person may well have the skills required.


This toolkit was brought to you by CINE and partners:

What is it? Online exhibition

What does it allow you to do? See how digital models might be curated

Cost? Free

Who is it for?


Timespan’s online Real Rights exhibition maps the history of the parish of Kildonan in East Sutherland, Scotland, looking at the intersection of colonialism and climate change.

Alongside more conventional objects, images and documents, the exhibition presents three digital reconstructions of archaeological sites from the parish – an Iron Age roundhouse settlement (500BC-500AD); a Highland Clearances longhouse settlement in 1813 and Helmsdale fishing village c.1890.

In addition to the rich historical content, the exhibition presents a way in which digital models of the past might be curated and interpreted alongside other types of historical document.


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What is it? Website presenting results of our Inch Island case study

What does it allow you to do? See what can be achieved through co-production

Cost? Free

Who is it for?


The Inch Heritage website is the result of a community co-production project between the people of Inch Island, County Donegal, Donegal County Museum and Ulster University.


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What is it? Online tool

What does it allow you to do? Create location-based heritage treasure hunt games

Cost? Free trial, publishing a game to the app store starts from €69 per day to €990 for a year depending on the duration and number of games required

Who is it for?


What is TurfHunt?

TurfHunt is a scavenger hunt game app designed to bring the traditional scavenger hunt game into the 21st century. The TurfHunt app has been used across the world and has many features including multiple game play modes and challenge types. The games are great for encouraging on location engagement and learning with games available both indoor or outdoor using GPS or BLE beacons to trigger game challenges.

Games can be played offline without an internet connection or online competitively with a scoreboard. Choose from various challenge types such as photo challenges (photo, sticker or drawing), multiple choice or single answer text questions and mini games like memory cards. All challenges can be linked together to play in a specific order or played at random.

TurfHunt is perfect for events, tourism and education purposes. The app can be used by anyone who wants to bring people together to explore on location, engaging with heritage and the environment in a fun and innovative way.

Getting started with TurfHunt


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What is it? Website showing case study site

What does it allow you to do? See what is possible through collaboration between heritage organisations and "techie" people

Cost? Free

Who is it for?


We used the latest technology and digitisation methods to tell the story of St. Catherine’s Church and graveyard in Killybegs, County Donegal, Ireland.

Killybegs History and Heritage Society collaborated with Donegal County Museum and Ulster University’s Intelligent Systems Research Centre to create a virtual reconstruction, virtual tour, and a series of 3D scans of artefacts from the site.

Virtual St. Catherine’s shows what can be achieved when heritage organisations and “techie” people collaborate on digital projects.


This toolkit was brought to you by CINE and partners:

What is it? Guideline

What does it allow you to do? Locate data sources for virtual world projects

Cost? Free

Who is it for?


Creating virtual reconstructions of past landscapes is an exciting but sometimes challenging process; archaeological and environmental data are essential to avoid holes or blank spots in your reconstruction.

This guideline will set out some of the sources of archaeological and environmental data that can be used, with a focus on sources of data available in Scotland.

Check back for the completed guideline soon.


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What is it? Guideline

What does it allow you to do? Understand ways that different knowledge holders can work together to understand and communicate a heritage landscape

Cost? Free

Who is it for?


What new knowledge can be generated when archaeologists, historians, community members and virtual modellers get together to recreate a landscape? This guideline will pull together the possibilities and set out some pointers communicating this understanding to others.

Check back for the completed guideline soon.


This toolkit was brought to you by CINE and partners:

What is it? Website containing guidelines and examples

What does it allow you to do? Learn about multimedia tools and platforms that can be used by community groups to help preserve natural and cultural heritage

Cost? Free, although using some of the tools or platforms recommended may incur a cost

Who is it for?


Digital technology has changed how we view and present our natural and cultural heritage.

Communities have access to digital multimedia tools and platforms that can be utilised to help preserve their natural and cultural heritage.

In the era of smart phones and mobile technology people have access to devices capture content that ranges from photography, high definition video to 3D artefact scanning and share their content to a global audience. This technology can empower communities to take ownership of their history, heritage and stories.

Through the development of digital tools and promotion of accessible platforms museums and heritage organisations can support communities in the creation of heritage content.

This website provides a series of ‘getting started’, guides for a range of digital tools we believe can provide value to community heritage projects.


This toolkit was brought to you by CINE and partners:

What is it? Online tool

What does it allow you to do? Create 360 degree tours for mobile Virtual Reality

Cost? Free

Who is it for?


Have you ever wished you could take everyone to that one near-by archaeological site that you just need to visit to understand properly? 360 degree digital tours can help solve the barriers of time and access limitations by allowing virtual visits to such sites. This tool allows you to create such tours through a simple process using photospheres, photos and audio that you may already have.



What is it? Online tool

What does it allow you to do? Create online virtual museums

Cost? Free

Who is it for?


What is CINEGATE?

CINEGATE is an online virtual museum and toolkit that allows users to store and share digital heritage assets such as 3D objects, virtual reconstructions and 360-degree tours through galleries, archives and exhibits.

We developed CINEGATE as a repository and portal for all of the digital heritage resources we created through the CINE project. Our partners in small museums, heritage organisations and community groups all contributed to the site.

Get CINEGATE

Would you like to use CINEGATE for your next digital heritage project? All you need to do is to sign up for a user profile and start adding your own galleries, archives and exhibits.


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What is it? Guidelines

What does it allow you to do? Digitise 3D objects using photogrammetry

Cost? Free, although you may need to buy some equipment for the photogrammetry

Who is it for?


Museums and heritage organisations often care for collections of intriguing and amazing objects, kept safe in their buildings. But imagine what more we could do if we could take these objects out of the museum back to the places where they were made and used, or share them with more people than could visit in person, or re-imagine their original surroundings: 3D digitisation of objects opens up all of these possibilities.

This toolkit contains guidelines on photogrammetry – a process of making 3D digital models by taking many photos with a conventional camera and then feeding those photos through some specific software. You can also see some of the 3D models we made of artefacts relating to our case study sites and explore links to other information and guides. 


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What is it? Toolkit containing Unity package and guidelines for use

What does it allow you to do? Create situated simulations of historical and future scenes

Cost? Free

Who is it for?


What is a Sitsim?

“Sitsim” is short for “Situated Simulation” a term that describes an experience in which viewers use a smartphone or tablet to see a reconstruction of the past – or a vision of the future – at the precise place in which they stand in the present.

Sitsims allow users to immediately understand and connect the landscape around them with the landscape and activities of the past or future reconstructed in the Sitsim. Historical objects or photographs can be easily taken back to their former locations, or museum objects can be re-inserted into their previous surroundings. Pop-up balloons allow users to find out more information about the scenes.

How are Sitsims made?

Creating a Sitsim requires 3 things: some historical information about the scene to be reconstructed; information about the terrain to be reconstructed; and the Sitsim AR Editor package for the Unity game engine.

The Sitsim AR Editor package for Unity and its guidelines can be downloaded from the bottom of this page.

Our collaborators at the University of Oslo have published a number of academic papers describing the development of the Sitsim AR Editor – find them all at http://www.sitsim.no/


This toolkit was brought to you by CINE and partners: